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5 Outdated Myths Everyone Still Believes About Bisexuality …

If a girl in a bar tells a guy she’s bisexual, there’s a significant chance his reaction will be a raised eyebrow and an, “Oh, really?” as a series of porn movie scenarios suddenly flash through his mind. If a guy tells his friends he’s bi, the reaction tends to be an unspoken, “Oh, so you’re gay, but are still figuring some things out.” In an era when understanding and acceptance of homosexuality is slowly becoming mainstream, lots of people still think bisexuality is just a sexy hobby.

Well, we spoke to Beth, a bisexual woman, and Jon, a bisexual man about their experiences being switch-hitters in a world that doesn’t make much of an effort to understand them. They said …

#5. Most People Seem To Think Bisexuality Isn’t Really A Thing

Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

Let’s try an experiment: Open up Google and type “do bisexual.” Two of the top results are “do bisexual males exist” and the more poorly structured “do bisexual exist.” Now consider that 3.1 percent of American adults identify as bisexual, compared with only 2.5 percent identifying as gay or lesbian. But on the flip side, while roughly three-quarters of all gay individuals are openly out, only 28 percent of all bisexuals are out, and only 12 percent of bi men openly identifying as such. Despite being the largest part of the LGBT community, they are also the least comfortable with their sexuality. This is to a large degree due to the fact that people just don’t believe them.

Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Getty Images
“If you’re really bi, deep throat this Popsicle. Right now.”

For instance, in a study that was picked up by no less than The New York Times under the “not at all prejudicial” headline, “Straight, Gay or Lying?” researchers actually decided to test out whether or not bi men were telling the truth by strapping them to a machine designed to measure their arousal and showing them some gay porn and some straight porn. They found that all the people who claimed to be bi were significantly more aroused by one or the other, thus apparently proving that bis are filthy goddamned liars. Of course, one-third of the men showed no arousal to either, even though nobody identified as asexual, but why should that stop them from drawing sweeping conclusions from a modicum of data?

But that’s just the way it is for bisexuals — in the collective consciousness, they exist as the mythological fusion of two extant creatures, like a mermaid, instead of a real combination that exists, like a spork. As Beth explained, “People definitely like to label you as just ‘going through a phase’ and will respond with statements like, ‘Oh, yeah, I experimented in college, too.’ And on the off chance you do get them to believe you, they’ll still split hairs by labeling you ‘bi-curious’ or ‘college lesbian’ or, my personal favorite, ‘heteroflexible.’”

Yuri_Arcurs/iStock/Getty Images
Or if you’re a guy “ambidickstrous”.

The backlash from the nonexistent bisexuals over the piece prompted the Times to do a follow-up article where the writer set out on a quest to prove that bisexuals exist, kind of like Bigfoot, instead of just gathering a bunch of people to a porn buffet and watching their dicks. Ultimately, the article concluded that bisexuals do exist and they have some grainy, out-of-focus pictures to prove it.

But bis aren’t just battling science for recognition. Even within the LGBT community, bisexuals are largely marginalized and ignored. According to Jon, “I remember talking to a gay guy at a party once about LGBT issues, and I made some comment to the effect that gay rights help bi people too. The guy responded, kind of angrily, that he didn’t think bisexuals belonged in the movement because, ‘they’ve always had the option of hiding as straight.’ Gay guys have a tendency to view bi men as deceitful.”

BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images
“Sell that shit elsewhere, you lying cunt-jockey!”

Another way to put it …

#4. People Think Bi Means “So Horny You’ll Fuck Anything”

Digital Vision./Digital Vision/Getty Images

If a TV character is bi, there’s a pretty good chance they’re having more sex than anybody else (such as, Olivia Wilde’s character on House). And why not? Since bisexuals can have fun with pretty much anyone, it only stands to reason that they’re rampaging (man)whores, right? If hetero people can barely keep it in their pants with a mere 3.5 billion potential partners to choose from, it’s just a nonstop orgy once you double that number.

pederk/iStock/Getty Images
They tried to have a bisexual-only movement, but all the meetings devolved into massive sex-parties.

“I’ve had comments made to the effect that bisexuals are always swingers,” says Jon. “And one girl said she could never date a bi guy because she ‘couldn’t trust him.’” Yeah, that’s the flip side of the “These kinky bastards are down for anything!” myth — an undercurrent of distrust of bisexuals, who are often viewed as deceitful. They refuse to pick a “side” so therefore must be willing to switch allegiances at the slightest provocation, like a naked Game of Thrones (so, regular Game of Thrones, we guess). It’s a pervasive enough idea that GLAAD had put up a page that specifically debunked the notion that bis are constantly rubbing their genitals on each other.

Beth has experienced this slut-suspicion as well: “As much as guys fantasize about wanting a girl who swings both ways, I think a lot of them get nervous when they’re confronted with the reality. Most people view female sexuality as somewhat malleable to begin with, so couple that with just the normal weird shit that women sometimes do like smacking each other on the ass, and they start viewing every woman as a threat. There’s this sort of insecurity that because you can enjoy sex with either gender, then you have to enjoy sex with either gender. Like there’s some piece of you that will always be unfulfilled without another set of giggly bits to play with, rather than a normal, monogamous person who prefers a loving, caring partner over casual sex.”

Marili Forastieri/Photodisc/Getty Images
“How can she be happy!?! Our balls … they’re gross.”

And then there’s the suspicion that with all the promiscuous sex that these bisexuals are having, they must be a veritable Petri dish of STDs. Beth recalls, “I remember my dad actually said once that bisexuals have more diseases than hetero or gay people (I’m not out to him) [because] they get diseases from straight people and gay people … if I get chlamydia from a man and chlamydia from a woman, do they form some kind of super Voltron chlamydia?” (Note: Beth does not have chlamydia.)

He’s hardly the only one who believes it — the University of Illinois had to spend money (probably your money) researching the fact that bis are not more likely to be carrying crotch plagues than anyone else.

#3. Everybody Assumes You’re Up For A Threesome

Jupiterimages/Stockbyte/Getty Images

Ah, the Holy Grail of sexual exploration: the three-way. You get all the kinky points for doing it while still being too classy to join an actual orgy. The obvious problem, however, is that for maximum enjoyment, someone needs to be ready to chow down on both pieces of equipment. Otherwise, you’re just sitting around, waiting for your turn, and if you wanted to sit idly by while two people go bananas on each other, you could have just gone to the bus station.

paul prescott/iStock/Getty Images
At least there, farting is tolerated, if not outright encouraged.

Since guys in general tend to be more “open” about their sexual desires, Beth has learned to be choosy with whom she comes out to. “I have to be super careful. Once they know I’m bi, it’s like I’m the threesome fairy. They’ll crack jokes about it constantly, in a ‘haha, just kidding, but maybe?’ kind of way. It’s even worse online. Putting ‘bi’ on your profile guarantees you’ll be inundated with requests for three-ways, mostly guys, but a fair number of girls, too. It got bad enough that I think OkCupid actually gives you the option that if you’re bi, you can appear as ‘straight’ to guys so they’ll stop pestering you for a threesome and can go back to pestering you for regular sex.”

But it’s not just dudes trying to attain the Unholy Trinity. “Every girlfriend that I’ve come out to has asked me for a threesome with two guys,” says Jon, “and I would probably guess that a third of my female friends have indicated they would be open to it as well. They try to be subtle about it by saying stuff like, ‘I’ve thought about having a threesome with two guys before’ and then waggling their eyebrows at me. It’s apparently a much more common fantasy than women have let on.”

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images News/Getty Images
“Oh, uh, I was just kidding … Double Stuf Oero?”

Well, ladies, that’s why God invented Craigslist. But there is one challenge that seems specific to the males …

June 29, 2015 | 0 Comments More

BiNet USA's Blog: BiNet USA Bisexual Media Guide …

With the Supreme Court expected to deliver a ruling on marriage equality any day now, BiNet USA and a crack team of experts from several different bi+ organizations drafted an update to the BiNet USA Bisexual Media Guide

BiNet USA Bisexual Media Guide

Marriage Edition

(updated June 2015)

Photo Caption/Credit: Image of bisexual pride flag with two golden rings


Bisexual Marriage Images
Bi+ Marriage Banner (2000×1333)
Bi+ Marriage Square Icon (970×970)
Bi+ Marriage Square Icon_sm (100×100)

TERMINOLOGY

Bisexual, Bi A person whose enduring physical, romantic, and/or emotional attraction is to other people of various sexes and/or gender identities. Individuals may experience this attraction in differing ways and degrees over their lifetime. Never use a hyphen or space when spelling bisexual. Avoid classifying information about bisexual people, communities, and identities as “bisexuality”; instead, use “bisexual” to refer to bisexual content. Using “bi” is often preferable, but when in doubt, always ask.

Biphobia Prejudice against and/or fear of bisexuals. Prejudice against bisexuals often occurs on both a cultural and personal level based on stereotypes, including inaccurate and harmful associations with infidelity, transphobia, binarism, confusion over their sexual orientation, promiscuity and transmission of sexually-transmitted diseases.

Bisexual erasure, Bi erasure Bisexual erasure or bisexual invisibility is the tendency to ignore, remove, falsify, or re-explain evidence of bisexuality in history, academia, news media and other primary sources. Bisexual erasure is often influenced by biphobia. Avoid bisexual erasure in headlines. If the story is about a bisexual person, the headline should NOT use “gay”; instead use “bi.”

Misorientation Misorientation occurs when bisexual people are identified incorrectly as gay, lesbian, or straight using current or previous relationship status instead of personal identification. When one or both members of a featured same-sex couple are bisexual, be sure to correctly identify them as such. Misorienting bi people leads to unnecessary and deeply harmful mental stress. AVOID: Opposite-sex couple, straight couple, heterosexual couple, gay couple, and lesbian couple, unless appropriate. USE: Different-sex couple, same-sex couple, and mixed-orientation marriage.

Mixed-Orientation Marriage A mixed-orientation marriage is a marriage between partners of differing sexual orientations and frequently occurs with bisexual people. Mixed-orientation marriages can have same-sex/gender or different-sex/gender partners but the bisexuals involved remain bisexual.

Different-Sex Couple A romantic pairing involving two people of different-sexes. The individuals involved may identify with any sexual orientation. Bisexuals and many other LGBT people may prefer to honor and recognize their relationship status with other ceremonies or ways than marriage. Seek to honor committed relationships no matter the sex or gender.

Same-Sex Couple A romantic pairing involving two people of same-sexes. The individuals involved may identify with various sexual orientations including gay, lesbian, bisexual, and asexual.

BISEXUAL TERMS TO AVOID

PROBLEMATIC TERMS

Problematic: “bi-sexual”, “BiSexual”

Preferred: “bisexual”

Do not use a hyphen in bisexual and only capitalize bisexual when used at the beginning of a sentence.

Problematic: “Chris Jones, who currently identifies as bisexual,” “Chris Jones, who identifies as bisexual,” “Chris Jones, a self-avowed bisexual.”

Preferred: “Chris Jones, a bisexual from Chicago…” or “Chris Jones, a bisexual mom of two.” It’s offensive to describe bisexual people as if their identity is transitory and is not a confirmed part of the person.

Problematic: “gay marriage,” “gay and lesbian couples”

Preferred: “marriage equality,” “the freedom to marry,” “gay, lesbian, and same-gender couples,” “couples in the LGBT community,” “same-/similar-sex couples”

Use “gay, lesbian, and same-gender” when discussing gay, lesbian and same-gender couples denied the right to have their marriages honored and acknowledged by state or federal law. See misorientation.

DEFAMATORY TERMS

Defamatory: “fence-sitter,” “breeder,” “bi-curious,” “lesbian until graduation,” “bisexual until graduation,” “college lesbian,” “gay for pay,” “buy-sexual,” “half-gay,” “swinger,” “Bi now, gay later,” “half-straight,” “Bi-Sexual,” “bar-sexual,” “down low,” “switch-hitter,” “try-sexual,” “Part-time Gay,” “Goes Both Ways,” “Swings Both Ways,” “Down Low” The bisexual orientation is an integral, valid and permanent part of a person’s identity. Do not characterize bisexual people as “passing,” as “confused,” as “indecisive,” as “lying” to other people, or as “pretending” to be bisexual. Such descriptions are defamatory and insulting and should ONLY be used when discussing and explaining such negative stereotypes.

Defamatory: “bisexuality reinforces the gender binary,” “bisexuals are gender-binarists.”

Recent slur frequently used by those uneducated on the history of the bisexual and transgender/gender nonconforming communities, identities, and experiences. In 1990, the manifesto of the long-standing bisexual publication “Anything That Moves” stated: “Bisexuality is a whole, fluid identity. Do not assume that bisexuality is binary or duogamous in nature: that we have ‘two’ sides or that we must be involved simultaneously with both genders to be fulfilled human beings. In fact, don’t assume that there are only two genders.” DO recognize that bisexuals define their identity as being attracted to those of the same-sex/gender or to those of different-sex/genders.

Defamatory: “hot sexy bi babe,” “bi babes,” “only hot because s/he’s bi,” “double your chances on a Saturday night”

Avoid any term that equates a bisexual person’s desirability to their bisexuality. Do not imply that being bisexual makes one more desirable as a sex partner. Doing so contributes to the high rates of sexual victimization bisexuals experience. Do not reference the Woody Allen quote about “doubling your chances on a Saturday night”: this is far different from what most bisexuals experience.

NAMES, LABEL USAGE, and DESCRIPTIONS

Numerous polls and surveys indicate the bisexual population to be 40–51% of the entire lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Many transgender persons, regardless of gender identity, also identify as bisexual. As a large community, bisexual people predominantly use “bisexual” as a Community Identity Label (similar to “lesbian,” “gay,” “straight,” or “queer”).

Use of a Community Identity Label helps describe commonalities, create safe spaces, and is essential to tracking the significant number of health and safety disparities bisexuals experience. At the same time, many bisexuals use Personal Identity Labels, which serve a vital function in describing differences while giving each individual a space to be unique. Personal Identity Labels like “pansexual,” “bi-dyke,” or “queer” may also reflect a particular attitude toward ideas such as Gender Theory.


While some bisexual people call themselves “pansexual,” “fluid,” “omnisexual,” “flexisexual,” “heteroflexible,” “non-monosexuals,” and/or “queer,” DO NOT use these terms UNLESS someone is explicitly self-identifying in this way. It’s important to note that many bisexuals use terms other than bisexual to avoid the immediate stigma that occurs when they self-identify as bisexual in gay, lesbian, or straight spaces.

The preferred shorthand for bisexual is “bi.” In recent years, the Bisexual Organizing Project has also popularized the use of the term “bi+” as shorthand for the long list of personal identity labels validated and celebrated in bisexual, pansexual, fluid, and queer communities.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

A BiNet USA Project with co-sponsorship from:

The American Institute of Bisexuality; the Bisexual Resource Center; the Bisexual Organizing Project; the New York Area Bisexual Network (NYABN); Bialogue; DC Alliance of Multicultural Bisexuals (AMBi); Los Angeles Bi Task Force; and Bisexual Books.

Bi Media Working Group, chaired by Faith Cheltenham, BiNet USA President:

ABilly Jones-Hennin, Alison Walkley, Amy Andre, Aud Traher, Cynthia Connors, Denise Penn, Ellyn Ruthstrom, Emily Dievendorf, Estraven, Gary North, Helen Acosta, Heron Greenesmith, Jim Larsen, Lauren Beach, Lindasusan Ulrich, Loraine Hutchins, Martin Rawlings-Fein, Meredith Lively, Dr. Mimi Hoang, Morgan Goode, Peter M. Ruggiero, Ron Suresha, Sarah Stumpf, and Stacey Langley.

With additional marriage equality edits from Alison Walkley, Aud Traher, Dani Siragusa, Ellyn Ruthstrom, Faith Cheltenham, Heron Greenesmith, Lynnette McFadzen, Paul Nocera, Peter Ruggiero, Robyn Ochs, Ron Suresha, and Toby Adams.


BISEXUAL COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

American Institute of Bisexuality


BiNet USA

Bisexual Organizing Project


Bisexual Resource Center

For more bisexual organizations in the United States

For more bisexual organizations worldwide


FURTHER READING

Books

Bi Any Other Name, by Loraine Hutchins and Lani Ka‘ahumanu
Bi Men: Coming Out, edited by Pete Chvany and Ron Suresha
Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World, edited by Robyn Ochs and Sarah Rowley
Recognize: The Voices of Bisexual Men, edited by Robyn Ochs and H. Sharif Williams (Dr. Herukhuti)

Bi America: Myths, Truths, and Struggles of an Invisible Community, by William Burleson

Links

Bisexual People of Color Mailing List and Resources ~ BiNet USA

“Way Beyond the Binary” ~ Bisexual Resource Center

Resource List for Mixed-Orientation Marriages ~ The BiCast

“Supporting and Caring for our Bisexual Youth” ~ The Human Rights Campaign

“Understanding Issues Facing Bisexual Americans” ~ The Movement Advancement Project

Bi Women Quarterly
www.biwomenboston.org

Please share widely, let’s educate people on our families, our marriages and our lives!

June 19, 2015 | 0 Comments More

BiNet USA Bisexual Media Guide – #MarriageEquality Edition

With the Supreme Court expected to deliver a ruling on marriage equality any day now, BiNet USA and a crack team of experts from several different bi+ organizations drafted an update to the BiNet USA Bisexual Media Guide

BiNet USA Bisexual Media Guide

Marriage Edition

(updated June 2015)

Photo Caption/Credit: Image of bisexual pride flag with two golden rings


Bisexual Marriage Images
Bi+ Marriage Banner (2000×1333)
Bi+ Marriage Square Icon (970×970)
Bi+ Marriage Square Icon_sm (100×100)

TERMINOLOGY

Bisexual, Bi A person whose enduring physical, romantic, and/or emotional attraction is to other people of various sexes and/or gender identities. Individuals may experience this attraction in differing ways and degrees over their lifetime. Never use a hyphen or space when spelling bisexual. Avoid classifying information about bisexual people, communities, and identities as “bisexuality”; instead, use “bisexual” to refer to bisexual content. Using “bi” is often preferable, but when in doubt, always ask.

Biphobia Prejudice against and/or fear of bisexuals. Prejudice against bisexuals often occurs on both a cultural and personal level based on stereotypes, including inaccurate and harmful associations with infidelity, transphobia, binarism, confusion over their sexual orientation, promiscuity and transmission of sexually-transmitted diseases.

Bisexual erasure, Bi erasure Bisexual erasure or bisexual invisibility is the tendency to ignore, remove, falsify, or re-explain evidence of bisexuality in history, academia, news media and other primary sources. Bisexual erasure is often influenced by biphobia. Avoid bisexual erasure in headlines. If the story is about a bisexual person, the headline should NOT use “gay”; instead use “bi.”

Misorientation Misorientation occurs when bisexual people are identified incorrectly as gay, lesbian, or straight using current or previous relationship status instead of personal identification. When one or both members of a featured same-sex couple are bisexual, be sure to correctly identify them as such. Misorienting bi people leads to unnecessary and deeply harmful mental stress. AVOID: Opposite-sex couple, straight couple, heterosexual couple, gay couple, and lesbian couple, unless appropriate. USE: Different-sex couple, same-sex couple, and mixed-orientation marriage.

Mixed-Orientation Marriage A mixed-orientation marriage is a marriage between partners of differing sexual orientations and frequently occurs with bisexual people. Mixed-orientation marriages can have same-sex/gender or different-sex/gender partners but the bisexuals involved remain bisexual.

Different-Sex Couple A romantic pairing involving two people of different-sexes. The individuals involved may identify with any sexual orientation. Bisexuals and many other LGBT people may prefer to honor and recognize their relationship status with other ceremonies or ways than marriage. Seek to honor committed relationships no matter the sex or gender.

Same-Sex Couple A romantic pairing involving two people of same-sexes. The individuals involved may identify with various sexual orientations including gay, lesbian, bisexual, and asexual.

BISEXUAL TERMS TO AVOID

PROBLEMATIC TERMS

Problematic: “bi-sexual”, “BiSexual”

Preferred: “bisexual”

Do not use a hyphen in bisexual and only capitalize bisexual when used at the beginning of a sentence.

Problematic: “Chris Jones, who currently identifies as bisexual,” “Chris Jones, who identifies as bisexual,” “Chris Jones, a self-avowed bisexual.”

Preferred: “Chris Jones, a bisexual from Chicago…” or “Chris Jones, a bisexual mom of two.” It’s offensive to describe bisexual people as if their identity is transitory and is not a confirmed part of the person.

Problematic: “gay marriage,” “gay and lesbian couples”

Preferred: “marriage equality,” “the freedom to marry,” “gay, lesbian, and same-gender couples,” “couples in the LGBT community,” “same-/similar-sex couples”

Use “gay, lesbian, and same-gender” when discussing gay, lesbian and same-gender couples denied the right to have their marriages honored and acknowledged by state or federal law. See misorientation.

DEFAMATORY TERMS

Defamatory: “fence-sitter,” “breeder,” “bi-curious,” “lesbian until graduation,” “bisexual until graduation,” “college lesbian,” “gay for pay,” “buy-sexual,” “half-gay,” “swinger,” “Bi now, gay later,” “half-straight,” “Bi-Sexual,” “bar-sexual,” “down low,” “switch-hitter,” “try-sexual,” “Part-time Gay,” “Goes Both Ways,” “Swings Both Ways,” “Down Low” The bisexual orientation is an integral, valid and permanent part of a person’s identity. Do not characterize bisexual people as “passing,” as “confused,” as “indecisive,” as “lying” to other people, or as “pretending” to be bisexual. Such descriptions are defamatory and insulting and should ONLY be used when discussing and explaining such negative stereotypes.

Defamatory: “bisexuality reinforces the gender binary,” “bisexuals are gender-binarists.”

Recent slur frequently used by those uneducated on the history of the bisexual and transgender/gender nonconforming communities, identities, and experiences. In 1990, the manifesto of the long-standing bisexual publication “Anything That Moves” stated: “Bisexuality is a whole, fluid identity. Do not assume that bisexuality is binary or duogamous in nature: that we have ‘two’ sides or that we must be involved simultaneously with both genders to be fulfilled human beings. In fact, don’t assume that there are only two genders.” DO recognize that bisexuals define their identity as being attracted to those of the same-sex/gender or to those of different-sex/genders.

Defamatory: “hot sexy bi babe,” “bi babes,” “only hot because s/he’s bi,” “double your chances on a Saturday night”

Avoid any term that equates a bisexual person’s desirability to their bisexuality. Do not imply that being bisexual makes one more desirable as a sex partner. Doing so contributes to the high rates of sexual victimization bisexuals experience. Do not reference the Woody Allen quote about “doubling your chances on a Saturday night”: this is far different from what most bisexuals experience.

NAMES, LABEL USAGE, and DESCRIPTIONS

Numerous polls and surveys indicate the bisexual population to be 40–51% of the entire lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Many transgender persons, regardless of gender identity, also identify as bisexual. As a large community, bisexual people predominantly use “bisexual” as a Community Identity Label (similar to “lesbian,” “gay,” “straight,” or “queer”).

Use of a Community Identity Label helps describe commonalities, create safe spaces, and is essential to tracking the significant number of health and safety disparities bisexuals experience. At the same time, many bisexuals use Personal Identity Labels, which serve a vital function in describing differences while giving each individual a space to be unique. Personal Identity Labels like “pansexual,” “bi-dyke,” or “queer” may also reflect a particular attitude toward ideas such as Gender Theory.


While some bisexual people call themselves “pansexual,” “fluid,” “omnisexual,” “flexisexual,” “heteroflexible,” “non-monosexuals,” and/or “queer,” DO NOT use these terms UNLESS someone is explicitly self-identifying in this way. It’s important to note that many bisexuals use terms other than bisexual to avoid the immediate stigma that occurs when they self-identify as bisexual in gay, lesbian, or straight spaces.

The preferred shorthand for bisexual is “bi.” In recent years, the Bisexual Organizing Project has also popularized the use of the term “bi+” as shorthand for the long list of personal identity labels validated and celebrated in bisexual, pansexual, fluid, and queer communities.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

A BiNet USA Project with co-sponsorship from:

The American Institute of Bisexuality; the Bisexual Resource Center; the Bisexual Organizing Project; the New York Area Bisexual Network (NYABN); Bialogue; DC Alliance of Multicultural Bisexuals (AMBi); Los Angeles Bi Task Force; and Bisexual Books.

Bi Media Working Group, chaired by Faith Cheltenham, BiNet USA President:

ABilly Jones-Hennin, Alison Walkley, Amy Andre, Aud Traher, Cynthia Connors, Denise Penn, Ellyn Ruthstrom, Emily Dievendorf, Estraven, Gary North, Helen Acosta, Heron Greenesmith, Jim Larsen, Lauren Beach, Lindasusan Ulrich, Loraine Hutchins, Martin Rawlings-Fein, Meredith Lively, Dr. Mimi Hoang, Morgan Goode, Peter M. Ruggiero, Ron Suresha, Sarah Stumpf, and Stacey Langley.

With additional marriage equality edits from Alison Walkley, Aud Traher, Dani Siragusa, Ellyn Ruthstrom, Faith Cheltenham, Heron Greenesmith, Lynnette McFadzen, Paul Nocera, Peter Ruggiero, Robyn Ochs, Ron Suresha, and Toby Adams.


BISEXUAL COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

American Institute of Bisexuality


BiNet USA

Bisexual Organizing Project


Bisexual Resource Center

For more bisexual organizations in the United States

For more bisexual organizations worldwide


FURTHER READING

Books

Bi Any Other Name, by Loraine Hutchins and Lani Ka‘ahumanu
Bi Men: Coming Out, edited by Pete Chvany and Ron Suresha
Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World, edited by Robyn Ochs and Sarah Rowley
Recognize: The Voices of Bisexual Men, edited by Robyn Ochs and H. Sharif Williams (Dr. Herukhuti)

Bi America: Myths, Truths, and Struggles of an Invisible Community, by William Burleson

Links

Bisexual People of Color Mailing List and Resources ~ BiNet USA

“Way Beyond the Binary” ~ Bisexual Resource Center

Resource List for Mixed-Orientation Marriages ~ The BiCast

“Supporting and Caring for our Bisexual Youth” ~ The Human Rights Campaign

“Understanding Issues Facing Bisexual Americans” ~ The Movement Advancement Project

Bi Women Quarterly
www.biwomenboston.org

Please share widely, let’s educate people on our families, our marriages and our lives!

June 19, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Dlisted | The Bi-Curious Case Of Brad Pitt

The Bi-Curious Case Of Brad Pitt

May 21, 2015 / Posted by:

Actually, more like, “The Bi-Curious Case Of Benjamin Buttfuckme,” amirite?

Hollywood insider,” socialite and friend of the Porn Iguana Hesham “Sham” Ibrahim (I know, his nickname is “Sham.” Too easy.) EXCLUSIVELY tells Star Magazine that it’s been known in certain circles for a decade that Brad Pitt also gets hungry for peen and regularly leases dick from hustler sites like Rentboy.com. Sham said that he’s not going to define Brad’s sexuality, but he knows that Brad fucks dudes from time to time. But Sham says that Brad is a picky eater, so to speak, and has sent a hooker away for not being up to his standards.

Sham says that ten years ago, Brad picked out the late porn star Cameron Fox on RentBoy and made plans to meet him at a hotel in Monterey, CA. I guess Brad wasn’t into the goods that Cameron served up, because Sham claims that he sent the dude away. Picky ass Pitt!

“When [Cameron] got there, an assistant met him in the lobby and took him to a room. Sure enough, there was Brad Pitt. Brad took one look at him, gave him a thousand dollars and asked him to leave. Cameron wasn’t as attractive as he appeared to be in his pictures. I guess Brad has picky taste.”

Since Cameron Fox is not with us anymore, he’s obviously not available to say if Sham’s story is lies covered in lies or not. Sham has heard that it’s kind of common for Brad to turn away rented ass, but when he finds a piece he’s into, he has a “routine” he busts out.

“They said he seemed to have the whole scenario pretty much worked out.”

As for Dame. St. Angie Jolie, Sham, who personally knows Brangelina as well as the nose pimple I just popped does, doesn’t think she’d mind since she’s into peen and poon herself.

Okay, but where are the only details any of us care about? I mean, is Brad Pitt a sloppy bossy pig bottom, a flip flop fucker, a BDSM power top or what? When Brad Pitt hires two rent boys, does he say to them, “I want you to Pitt roast me!” Does Brad Pitt’s greasy, cheesy ass get a discount since he’s pre-lubed? I cannot take this story seriously until I get these highly important details. Oh, Star Magazine, to think, I thought I knew you as a highly-esteemed literary journal that cared about uncovering important details like that.

May 21, 2015 | 0 Comments More

heteroflexibility and bisexual invisiblity | Defeating the Dragons

Continue reading:  heteroflexibility and bisexual invisiblity | Defeating the Dragons

April 22, 2015 | 0 Comments More